About Us

Blue Moon Tropicals is a central Orlando-based hobby farm specializing in ornamental micro-gardening. With sustainability and propagation in mind, we grow many of our own product to control quality and meet demand. 

After working in commercial horticulture, I began setting up at local events and markets to peddle plants. It wasn’t until my father was diagnosed with skin and lung cancer in early 2020 when I decided I needed to do this for real. Without insurance, costs for radiation, chemotherapy, hospital stays, tests, surgeries, and doctor’s visits began to stack up – and his loss of employment didn’t make things easier. 

Shortly after his 65th birthday at the end of July, it was discovered the cancer had spread to his brain and he began whole brain radiation and immunotherapy. On August 17th, 2021 he lost the battle with cancer and is no longer suffering.

Without the continued support of our customers – those who attended our open-house sales, visited us at pop-up events and markets, and use our online shop, there would have been no way to afford the treatment he received. For that, I thank you and will continue to operate Blue Moon Tropicals to provide support to my father’s dependents. 

Howl

Howl is a two-year-old American Blue Bay Shepherd. Howl is a lazy guy who loves dinner time and laying on the couch. Despite their differences, Howl and Lucy are best friends who love to run, wrestle, and help us with farm chores.

 
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Lucy

 

Lucy is a four-year-old Black German Shepherd Dog. She’s a people-pleaser and loves a puzzle. She loves playing fetch and watching over her flock. She’s a sweet girl with a happy tail!

Peafowl

We frequently post about our Peafowl, but in reality, they are a roaming flock with an unknown origin. We have somewhat adopted them, but they remain free roaming, coming and going as they please. We enjoy seeing the same group every day as they stop by for breakfast and dinner. They return the favor by bringing their babies for us to see!

Chickens

With a flock of around 25, we are certainly not producing eggs in great numbers. Our free range birds are regarded as pets and when we have extra eggs, we share them with the community.